Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Review of Huey Lewis and Joe Cocker Concert from Ravinia

My review of the Huey Lewis/Joe Cocker Concert at Ravinia.(rockchicago.net). One of the things I do in my spare time (rock reviews) when I am not involved with veterinary medicine.

Dr. Sakas

Huey Lewis and Joe Cocker Tear Up Ravinia

by rockchicago
Photos by Peter S. Sakas 

I had great anticipation for this concert at Ravinia as Huey Lewis and Joe Cocker are two classic acts. It was a nice pairing of two masters of so-called “blue-eyed soul,” blues-rock, and rock. I had seen Huey Lewis several years ago when he had performed at Ravinia and as he was my wife’s favorite she was eager to see him again. I had seen all sorts of concert footage of Joe Cocker through the years but never had the experience of seeing him life. So we were both very excited about attending this concert at the fine venue that is Ravinia.

We arrived at 5:30 PM (90 minutes before the start of the concert) and the main parking lot was already filled. As we strolled around the grounds, the lawn was almost completely filled at this time with people dining and awaiting the concert, showing what a great draw these acts were.

Huey Lewis and the News
At the start of the concert I was surprised as it was about ¾ full. It was definitely a late-arriving crowd and it was definitely their loss to miss any part of this performance. The band came on stage and took their places with their instruments. The “beating” of the bass drum was audible and the crowd instantly recognized the introduction to the monster hit, The Heart of Rock and Roll. Huey Lewis then walked onstage to rousing applause, put his harmonica to his lips and we were on our way for a great concert experience. Huey was dressed casually in a lavender shirt, blue jeans, loafers, tinted glasses, was well-coiffed, and appeared quite fit for his sixty two years. But most importantly, his voice sounded just fine, age had done nothing to his distinctive vocals at all. He had terrific energy which he displayed all night long, roaming the entire length of the stage, and had that “feel good” type charisma he always projected



He then moved right into (She’s) Some Kind of Wonderful. He was working pretty hard to get the audience fired up, but they still seemed to be in a bit of a stupor; maybe from their wine or a food coma. He encouraged the audience to join in with “I need some help.” But at this point there was what I felt a weak response to his entreaty. He received a nice ovation, but I felt that the crowd should really be more appreciative of the great job he was doing on stage.

He then introduced his two back up singers who sang lead with him on the Staples Singers classic Respect Yourself, which had been featured on his recent release “SoulsvilleUSA.” It was a super cover of this soul classic, his female back ups were superlative and Huey Lewis proved he could sing “soul music” as well as anyone! Outstanding.

The ensuing song was Never Like This Before and it really showcased his fine band. This song was punctuated by a killer guitar solo. The band consisted of a guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, three saxes, one trumpet, and the two female back up singers. It was a fine collection of skilled musicians.



Following a nice keyboard introduction Huey Lewis went into I Want a New Drug / Small World medley. Once again it featured a fine guitar solo, a solid horn section with a super sax solo. Huey kept encouraging the band while standing in the back of the stage during the solos, clapping along and dancing. It was an upbeat, rocking song and finally the crowd seemed to wake up and reward the band with a well-deserved rousing round of applause.

Huey Lewis seemed to begin to feed off the energy of the newly responsive crowd. He began I’m Doing It All For My Baby and as the audience recognized the tune greeted it with applause. Huey kept walking back and forth across the stage gesturing to the crowd and encouraging them. When he was at the verse “doing it all for my baby” he was imploring the crowd to sing along, holding the mike over the crowd. He let out a primal scream and that led into a guitar solo to end the tune. The band received a standing ovation.

Huey then pulled out his harmonica once again for the next song, Jacob’s Ladder. As he was singing he was carrying the microphone stand around and gesturing, giving a very spirited performance. There was an extended guitar solo as well as a harmonica solo by Huey.



Following the nice ovation he called out to the crowd, “Are you with me so far?’ There was a full-throated assent from the crowd. “Good. It was the right answer,” Huey responded. “Thanks, we are pleased to be inChicago, seeing so many of our youthful fans.” His next line cracked me up. “We used to be a beer and hot dog band and now we are hanging with a wine and cheese crowd….and I like it!” He then asked how many in the audience had seen Huey Lewis and the News before. A large number of hands went up and he replied, “You have great musical taste!” He went on to ask how many were seeing the band for the first time and a fairly large number of hands went up. He responded with, “I’m surprised, as we have only been together for THIRTY FOUR YEARS!” He then introduced the band. As the band was originally formed inSan Francisco, almost all the musicians were fromCalifornia.

He then remarked that the next song was going to be an audience participation number and they would be performing the song accapella. There were six vocalists on Little Bitty Pretty One, accompanied by a snare drum, bass and a couple of saxes. Huey Lewis said, “If you know it sing along, if you don’t, just clap. Don’t be shy…but you can’t be because this is CHICAGO!” The audience eagerly joined in by singing and clapping.

The band then continued with Stuck With You and some people started standing and dancing. Huey Lewis was pacing back and forth all over the stage, really seeming to be having a good time.

The Huey Lewis and the News mania continued as they went right into another huge hit, Heart and Soul. Huey was holding the microphone over the crowd as they were singing along with the chorus, “OOOOOO, OOOO” and encouraging everyone to clap their hands. There was another fine guitar solo and the crowd was really feeling it at this point. Huey let out another primal scream and the crowd gave a standing ovation. Huey peered out over the crowd and was pumping his fists. “Are you still with me? Say yeah!” The audience and Huey kept alternately cheering “yeah” back and forth. He had the whole audience standing and clapping.



The next song continued the emotional high as they began “But It’s Alright” the J.J. Jackson classic hit from the sixties (and one of my all time favorite upbeat songs). Huey did not disappoint one bit as he was manic on stage, strutting back and forth. He even performed a mini-xylophone solo (the instrument was held up by one of the back up singers). At the end of the song he let out another scream, “Oooooowwwww. Are you still with me? Prove it!”

For the final song of the set they performed Long Time, Good Time. There was a fine organ solo, which upon its completion Huey Lewis raised his hands to the Heavens and intoned “Lord have mercy!” He yelled out, “Did you have a good time?” The audience responded with a huge “yeah.” Huey once again was doing his fist pump. The song ended with a great guitar, then sax solo. The crowd gave a standing ovation.



The crowd then began clamoring for an encore. In one of my previous reviews (the Aerosmith review) I remarked how the cheering for encores had changed through the years. In my time it was standing, clapping and chanting “More, more!” That morphed into the holding of lighters. At the Aerosmith show it was people holding up their smartphones, some with images of a lit lighter on the screen. Well, as this was definitely an older crowd, I heard the crowd chanting “More, more!” There were no smartphones held up, no lighters. I had a broad smile on my face as I then began to chant more, more and clapping along. I was back in my element with my contemporaries!



The band came back out for the encore and Huey Lewis was spreading his arms wide, holding a bottle of water. He said, “All right, if you insist.” He continued with, “Thank you. We love what we do, but we can’t do it without you.”

He introduced the first song of the encore with, “We are going to do a song we wrote twenty six years ago. Who knew when we wrote it, we’d play it, EVERY NIGHT OF OUR LIVES!” The band then went into The Power of Love, their gigantic hit. Huey Lewis kept encouraging the audience, “Can you feel it?” “Sing it with me.” The audience was rocking! There was a huge standing ovation.

Huey Lewis introduced the next song by saying “These are some tough times to working folks. We dedicate this song as we do every night to the working folks. Workin’ for a Living.” Another enthusiastic performance. Huey Lewis and the band would be periodically flexing their arm muscles while performing. Huey also gave a pair of killer harmonica solos. The crowd gave a standing ovation as the band took their bows. They all rolled up their sleeves and flexed their arms. A great ending to a phenomenal show.



Huey Lewis and the News did not disappoint one bit, vocally nor musically. There was a palpable enthusiasm which Huey projected from the stage and it pervaded over the entire audience. For all the years he has been performing he was not just going through the motions, it was like he was performing these songs for the first time. It was a special experience for all in attendance. My wife is a huge fan and she was absolutely enthralled by his performance this evening. No one could have been the least bit disappointed by this quality performer and his wonderful concert.

Joe Cocker
I did not know what to expect from Joe Cocker. He had turned sixty-eight in May and he has been performing since 1960. I still had the mental images of him dancing in my head from his classicWoodstockperformances and also the outstanding parody by John Belushi from Saturday Night Live. He walked on stage to a warm, enthusiastic reception by the crowd. Here was this balding, heavy set man, with a scraggly beard, wearing a sport coat and running shoes, looking nothing like what I remembered him as in my mind’s eye. Then he began to sing! And boy did he sing! He sounded absolutely great. His voice has always been rough and gruff so age had not diminished it in the least. The only thing that had changed was that his hallmark frantic gestures (air guitar, air keyboard, strange gyrations) although still evident were definitely subdued. He still was a demonstrative performer and would contort his face in strange ways as he sang, but not to the degree in the past. My wife had never seen him perform ever, and said to me that it looked like he was having a heart attack, a seizure, or asthma attack. I just mentioned, you should have seen him years ago!



He opened with Hitchcock Railway. It was followed by a cover of Traffic’s Feelin’ Alright, which was probably one of the songs that propelled him on his way to legendary status. The audience was totally into Cocker’s performances and many were standing and dancing. He was up there singing his heart out and sounding absolutely great. He received a standing ovation.

The following song was his cover of a hit by the Box Tops, The Letter, which he “made his own” due to his phenomenal rendition. His rendition at this concert was no less phenomenal than the original recording. He was backed up by a great set of musicians, two keyboards, a sax, drums, guitar, bass, and two back up singers. This song was distinguished by great piano, sax, organ, and guitar solos. Joe Cocker was gesturing, doing his inimitable air guitar! As the song was completing, on the last note, he jumped up into the air! Not too bad for a man nearing seventy.

He then slowed it down a bit with a ballad. After a nice piano introduction, he went into When the Night Comes. Even with his “rough voice” he comes across well in the soft, ballads as well.

For the next song he said, “I’d like to welcome back the great Huey Lewis. He’s gonna help us play some blues.” Huey Lewis opened on harmonica as they performed Lonely Avenue, a nice blues number. After the song, Cocker gave Huey a great big bear hug.

As the familiar piano opening of Up Where We Belong was recognized by the audience there were whoops and hollers of approval. It was a great duet with one of his back up singers. I had a bit of a problem with her rendition as I was so used to the “country style” voice of the original Jennifer Warnes and she was a bit more “soul.” But it was nicely done nonetheless. Cocker was making great facial expressions throughout the entire song and played his “air keyboards.’

Keeping with the mellow theme he then went into the Billy Preston classic, which Cocker once again “made his own,” You Are So Beautiful. Once again as the crowd heard the familiar tune, they whooped and hollered. They began singing along. At the end of the song, Cocker had the trademark high pitched “to me” and the audience went wild, giving him the loudest standing ovation of the night.



Let me digress a moment to make some observations. When I first would watch Joe Cocker when he burst on the scene atWoodstock, he was more of a curiosity to me. His strange contortions, gyrations, screaming, etc. were very amusing to me. But as I was listening to him perform at this concert I realized what an amazing body of work this man has accumulated. He has recorded so many outstanding, iconic, classic songs. My wife mentioned to me during the concert that he has sung a lot of great songs which she did not realize were his and that she really was enjoying his performance. I then made some critical evaluations of my own. This man has covered so many songs, that he has “made his own,” that the original has paled by comparison. What makes Joe Cocker’s music so great? It is his interpretation of the song. It is his phrasing. It is his emotion. It is his wonderful vocal instrument which is so unique and can sound so alluring in a love ballad, yet be front and center in a blues-rocker! I had an epiphany. This man is not a gimmicky, quirky, twitchy singer. He is truly an outstanding musician, loaded with talent who has the amazing ability to work magic with the songs he sings. I was enraptured with his singing all night long!

His next selection was Hard Knocks which was another well done bluesy tune, accentuated by some fine guitar work.

His female bass player stepped forward and began playing the familiar bass line of the Beatle classic Come Together which the crowd greeted with approval. It was a great rocking tune, the band sounded outstanding, there was once again some fine guitar work and the audience sang along to the iconic song. Cocker’s take on this tune was unique and sounded absolutely great. Needless to say, another standing ovation.

Cocker then did a band introduction and this concert started to really amp up even higher than it was already at this point. The keyboard and sax created the “horn” introduction to the Randy Newman song, once again co-opted by Cocker, You Can Leave Your Hat On. All I could say was ….wow! The whole crowd was standing up and gyrating to this sensuous tune. Not meaning to insult anyone, but they were some good dancers in the audience and some “not so good dancers’ in the audience (who just could not find the beat). But the key point I am going to make is, that his music moved people to get up and dance and did they ever. The phrase “dance like no one is watching” sure held true. I watched the unabashed joy the audience members had dancing to the music of Joe Cocker and it made me appreciate his genius even more. Another standing ovation.

Cocker continued with a cover of the Ray Charles classic, Unchain My Heart, which as I have been saying all night, he “made his own.” It was a very energetic version, there was spontaneous dancing, a great sax solo, and Cocker once again did his trademark jump to accentuate the closing note. Standing ovation once again.



As the opening notes of the final song of the set were played on the organ everyone in the house knew what was coming, the Beatle classic (and the first song I had ever seen him perform in the film Woodstock) With a Little Help From My Friends. The audience began clapping and singing right from the start. The crowd absolutely loved this song. When he got to the part “Do you need anybody” and he gave his trademark scream….boy did he deliver that scream with gusto and the crowd roared its approval! He changed the words a bit as he continued singing “you need your friends, I got my friends with me” and the music kept building. When it became more intense he let out another full throated scream, played some air guitar, screamed again and if there was anyone sitting down they were now on their feet. The song ended on this driving, incessant beat working Cocker and the crowd into a frenzy. Once again on the last note he jumped in the air, the crowd went wild. Wow, wow, wow!

Cocker came back for the encore and did another Beatle cover, once again another song that became one of his bona fide hits, She Came in Through the Bathroom Window. The crowd stood, sang and danced for the entire encore. This song had the band cooking once again with another superlative guitar solo.
The final song of the night was Cry Me a River, a Julie London cover. This song was another highlight of the evening. Outstanding solos on the organ, piano, and guitar. But it was the phenomenal vocal talents of Joe Cocker which stood out. As the song ended he yelled out “Chicago, keep rocking. You’re the best!” He punctuated that statement with his trademark jump on the last note of the song once again. As he walked off the stage he received another rousing standing ovation.

What a concert experience this was for all who attended. We were treated to energetic and outstanding performances by two supremely talented musicians (and their bands) who, despite their years, performed with the enthusiasm of men a fraction of their ages. Vocally they still had it. To say it was a very entertaining evening would be a gross understatement. I walked away from that concert having even more respect for the performers than I did before.

A comment about the concert venue. We had pavilion seats and the sound was outstanding. It was clear, not distorted and the volume was just fine. I have been to way too many venues where the poor sound systems and extreme volume made the experience unbearable. Not so here. The whole Ravinia operation was top notch and made a fine concert an even more pleasurable experience.

Reviewed by Peter S. Sakas on 8/10/12

Canine tail chasing resembles human obsessive compulsive disorders August 20, 2012 A new research led by Professor Hannes Lohi at the University of Helsinki, Finland, revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: Early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. Ads by Google EHR Software Demo - Watch the EHR Demo Online Now Meaningful Use with Ease of Use! - AdvancedMD.com/Elec-Health-Record The genetics research group, based at the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Center and led by Professor Hannes Lohi, has in collaboration with an international group of researchers investigated the characteristics and environmental factors associated with compulsive tail chasing in dogs. A questionnaire study covering nearly 400 dogs revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. The study shows that dogs offer an excellent animal model for studying the genetic background and environmental factors associated with human obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The study has been published in the journal PLoS ONE on July 27, 2012. Stereotypical behavior in pets has not been studied extensively, even though several different types of compulsive behavior occur in different species including dogs. A dog may recurrently chase lights or shadows, bite or lick its own flank, pace compulsively or chase its own tail. Different environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to predispose to compulsive behavior. Many stereotypes are breed-specific, which emphasizes the role of genes. Compulsive tail chasing occurs in several dog breeds, but worldwide it is most common in breeds such as Bull Terriers and German Shepherds. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs, to identify possible environmental risk factors, and to find out whether a previously discovered gene region associated with compulsive behavior is also linked to tail chasing. Ads by Google AMD Genetic Testing - Macula Risk is reimbursed by insurers including Medicare - www.macularisk.com Could vitamins have an influence? Nearly 400 Finnish dogs participated in this study, including Bull Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, German Shepherds and Staffordshire Bull Terriers respectively. Blood samples were taken from the dogs participating in the study, and their owners filled out a questionnaire about their dogs' stereotypic behavior. The questionnaire included questions about different stereotypic behaviors, as well as aspects of each dog's puppyhood and the routines of the dog's current daily life. In addition to this the owners evaluated their dogs' personality based on the questions in the questionnaire. The study included dogs that chased their tails daily for several hours, dogs that chased their tails a few times a month, and dogs that had observably never chased their tails. With most of the dogs, the tail chasing had begun at the age of 3 to 6 months, before reaching sexual maturity. One of the most interesting findings of this study is the connection with stereotypic behavior and vitamins and minerals. Dogs that received nutritional supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, with their food, chased their tails less. "Our study does not prove an actual causal relationship between vitamins and lessened tail chasing, but interestingly similar preliminary results have been observed in human OCD" says researcher, Katriina Tiira, PhD. Follow-up studies will aim to prove whether vitamins could be beneficial in the treatment of tail chasing. Early separation from the mother and the mother's poor care of the puppy were also found in the study to predispose dogs to tail chasing. Early separation from the mother has been discovered to predispose also other animals to stereotypic behavior, but this is the first time this connection has been made with dogs. The amount of exercise the dogs received or the number of activities they engaged in did not, however, seem to have a connection with tail chasing. This could be comforting news to many owners of dogs with compulsive behaviors, since often the owners themselves or the dogs' living environment may be blamed for these behaviors. Although frustration and stress are likely to be significant causes of the occurrence of stereotypic behavior in for example zoo animals, they may be of lesser significance when it comes to Finnish dogs that are walked regularly. Tail chasing in dogs can be used as an animal model for studying the genetic background of OCD in humans Compared to the control dogs, tail chasers suffered more from also other stereotypic behaviors. In addition, tail chasers were more timid and afraid of loud noises. "Different types of compulsive behavior occur simultaneously in humans suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder or other diseases such as autism" explains the head of the study, Professor Hannes Lohi. Dogs may turn out to be of significant use in investigating the causes of human psychiatric diseases. "Stereotypic behavior occurs in dogs spontaneously; they share the same environment with humans, and as large animals are physiologically close to humans. Furthermore, their strict breed structure aids the identification of genes." The gene region previously associated with compulsive flank licking and biting in Dobermans was not found to be associated with tail chasing in any of the breeds in this study. The next aim of this research project is thus to discover new gene regions connected to tail chasing. The study is part of a larger DOGPSYCH project, funded by the European Research Council, in which the genetic background of different anxiety disorders, such as timidity, compulsive behavior and sound sensitivity are investigated, as well as their similarities with corresponding human diseases. Journal reference: PLoS ONE search and more info website Provided by University of Helsinki

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-08-canine-tail-resembles-human-obsessive.html#jCp
Canine tail chasing resembles human obsessive compulsive disorders August 20, 2012 A new research led by Professor Hannes Lohi at the University of Helsinki, Finland, revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: Early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. Ads by Google EHR Software Demo - Watch the EHR Demo Online Now Meaningful Use with Ease of Use! - AdvancedMD.com/Elec-Health-Record The genetics research group, based at the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Center and led by Professor Hannes Lohi, has in collaboration with an international group of researchers investigated the characteristics and environmental factors associated with compulsive tail chasing in dogs. A questionnaire study covering nearly 400 dogs revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. The study shows that dogs offer an excellent animal model for studying the genetic background and environmental factors associated with human obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The study has been published in the journal PLoS ONE on July 27, 2012. Stereotypical behavior in pets has not been studied extensively, even though several different types of compulsive behavior occur in different species including dogs. A dog may recurrently chase lights or shadows, bite or lick its own flank, pace compulsively or chase its own tail. Different environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to predispose to compulsive behavior. Many stereotypes are breed-specific, which emphasizes the role of genes. Compulsive tail chasing occurs in several dog breeds, but worldwide it is most common in breeds such as Bull Terriers and German Shepherds. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs, to identify possible environmental risk factors, and to find out whether a previously discovered gene region associated with compulsive behavior is also linked to tail chasing. Ads by Google AMD Genetic Testing - Macula Risk is reimbursed by insurers including Medicare - www.macularisk.com Could vitamins have an influence? Nearly 400 Finnish dogs participated in this study, including Bull Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, German Shepherds and Staffordshire Bull Terriers respectively. Blood samples were taken from the dogs participating in the study, and their owners filled out a questionnaire about their dogs' stereotypic behavior. The questionnaire included questions about different stereotypic behaviors, as well as aspects of each dog's puppyhood and the routines of the dog's current daily life. In addition to this the owners evaluated their dogs' personality based on the questions in the questionnaire. The study included dogs that chased their tails daily for several hours, dogs that chased their tails a few times a month, and dogs that had observably never chased their tails. With most of the dogs, the tail chasing had begun at the age of 3 to 6 months, before reaching sexual maturity. One of the most interesting findings of this study is the connection with stereotypic behavior and vitamins and minerals. Dogs that received nutritional supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, with their food, chased their tails less. "Our study does not prove an actual causal relationship between vitamins and lessened tail chasing, but interestingly similar preliminary results have been observed in human OCD" says researcher, Katriina Tiira, PhD. Follow-up studies will aim to prove whether vitamins could be beneficial in the treatment of tail chasing. Early separation from the mother and the mother's poor care of the puppy were also found in the study to predispose dogs to tail chasing. Early separation from the mother has been discovered to predispose also other animals to stereotypic behavior, but this is the first time this connection has been made with dogs. The amount of exercise the dogs received or the number of activities they engaged in did not, however, seem to have a connection with tail chasing. This could be comforting news to many owners of dogs with compulsive behaviors, since often the owners themselves or the dogs' living environment may be blamed for these behaviors. Although frustration and stress are likely to be significant causes of the occurrence of stereotypic behavior in for example zoo animals, they may be of lesser significance when it comes to Finnish dogs that are walked regularly. Tail chasing in dogs can be used as an animal model for studying the genetic background of OCD in humans Compared to the control dogs, tail chasers suffered more from also other stereotypic behaviors. In addition, tail chasers were more timid and afraid of loud noises. "Different types of compulsive behavior occur simultaneously in humans suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder or other diseases such as autism" explains the head of the study, Professor Hannes Lohi. Dogs may turn out to be of significant use in investigating the causes of human psychiatric diseases. "Stereotypic behavior occurs in dogs spontaneously; they share the same environment with humans, and as large animals are physiologically close to humans. Furthermore, their strict breed structure aids the identification of genes." The gene region previously associated with compulsive flank licking and biting in Dobermans was not found to be associated with tail chasing in any of the breeds in this study. The next aim of this research project is thus to discover new gene regions connected to tail chasing. The study is part of a larger DOGPSYCH project, funded by the European Research Council, in which the genetic background of different anxiety disorders, such as timidity, compulsive behavior and sound sensitivity are investigated, as well as their similarities with corresponding human diseases. Journal reference: PLoS ONE search and more info website Provided by University of Helsinki search and more info

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-08-canine-tail-resembles-human-obsessive.html#jCp
Canine tail chasing resembles human obsessive compulsive disorders August 20, 2012 A new research led by Professor Hannes Lohi at the University of Helsinki, Finland, revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: Early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. Ads by Google EHR Software Demo - Watch the EHR Demo Online Now Meaningful Use with Ease of Use! - AdvancedMD.com/Elec-Health-Record The genetics research group, based at the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Center and led by Professor Hannes Lohi, has in collaboration with an international group of researchers investigated the characteristics and environmental factors associated with compulsive tail chasing in dogs. A questionnaire study covering nearly 400 dogs revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. The study shows that dogs offer an excellent animal model for studying the genetic background and environmental factors associated with human obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The study has been published in the journal PLoS ONE on July 27, 2012. Stereotypical behavior in pets has not been studied extensively, even though several different types of compulsive behavior occur in different species including dogs. A dog may recurrently chase lights or shadows, bite or lick its own flank, pace compulsively or chase its own tail. Different environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to predispose to compulsive behavior. Many stereotypes are breed-specific, which emphasizes the role of genes. Compulsive tail chasing occurs in several dog breeds, but worldwide it is most common in breeds such as Bull Terriers and German Shepherds. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs, to identify possible environmental risk factors, and to find out whether a previously discovered gene region associated with compulsive behavior is also linked to tail chasing. Ads by Google AMD Genetic Testing - Macula Risk is reimbursed by insurers including Medicare - www.macularisk.com Could vitamins have an influence? Nearly 400 Finnish dogs participated in this study, including Bull Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, German Shepherds and Staffordshire Bull Terriers respectively. Blood samples were taken from the dogs participating in the study, and their owners filled out a questionnaire about their dogs' stereotypic behavior. The questionnaire included questions about different stereotypic behaviors, as well as aspects of each dog's puppyhood and the routines of the dog's current daily life. In addition to this the owners evaluated their dogs' personality based on the questions in the questionnaire. The study included dogs that chased their tails daily for several hours, dogs that chased their tails a few times a month, and dogs that had observably never chased their tails. With most of the dogs, the tail chasing had begun at the age of 3 to 6 months, before reaching sexual maturity. One of the most interesting findings of this study is the connection with stereotypic behavior and vitamins and minerals. Dogs that received nutritional supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, with their food, chased their tails less. "Our study does not prove an actual causal relationship between vitamins and lessened tail chasing, but interestingly similar preliminary results have been observed in human OCD" says researcher, Katriina Tiira, PhD. Follow-up studies will aim to prove whether vitamins could be beneficial in the treatment of tail chasing. Early separation from the mother and the mother's poor care of the puppy were also found in the study to predispose dogs to tail chasing. Early separation from the mother has been discovered to predispose also other animals to stereotypic behavior, but this is the first time this connection has been made with dogs. The amount of exercise the dogs received or the number of activities they engaged in did not, however, seem to have a connection with tail chasing. This could be comforting news to many owners of dogs with compulsive behaviors, since often the owners themselves or the dogs' living environment may be blamed for these behaviors. Although frustration and stress are likely to be significant causes of the occurrence of stereotypic behavior in for example zoo animals, they may be of lesser significance when it comes to Finnish dogs that are walked regularly. Tail chasing in dogs can be used as an animal model for studying the genetic background of OCD in humans Compared to the control dogs, tail chasers suffered more from also other stereotypic behaviors. In addition, tail chasers were more timid and afraid of loud noises. "Different types of compulsive behavior occur simultaneously in humans suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder or other diseases such as autism" explains the head of the study, Professor Hannes Lohi. Dogs may turn out to be of significant use in investigating the causes of human psychiatric diseases. "Stereotypic behavior occurs in dogs spontaneously; they share the same environment with humans, and as large animals are physiologically close to humans. Furthermore, their strict breed structure aids the identification of genes." The gene region previously associated with compulsive flank licking and biting in Dobermans was not found to be associated with tail chasing in any of the breeds in this study. The next aim of this research project is thus to discover new gene regions connected to tail chasing. The study is part of a larger DOGPSYCH project, funded by the European Research Council, in which the genetic background of different anxiety disorders, such as timidity, compulsive behavior and sound sensitivity are investigated, as well as their similarities with corresponding human diseases. Journal reference: PLoS ONE search and more info website Provided by University of Helsinki search and more info

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-08-canine-tail-resembles-human-obsessive.html#jCp
Canine tail chasing resembles human obsessive compulsive disorders August 20, 2012 A new research led by Professor Hannes Lohi at the University of Helsinki, Finland, revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: Early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. Ads by Google EHR Software Demo - Watch the EHR Demo Online Now Meaningful Use with Ease of Use! - AdvancedMD.com/Elec-Health-Record The genetics research group, based at the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Center and led by Professor Hannes Lohi, has in collaboration with an international group of researchers investigated the characteristics and environmental factors associated with compulsive tail chasing in dogs. A questionnaire study covering nearly 400 dogs revealed several similarities between compulsive behavior in dogs and humans: early onset, recurrent compulsive behaviors, increased risk for developing different types of compulsions, compulsive freezing, the beneficial effect of nutritional supplements, the effects of early life experiences and sex hormones and genetic risk. The study shows that dogs offer an excellent animal model for studying the genetic background and environmental factors associated with human obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD). The study has been published in the journal PLoS ONE on July 27, 2012. Stereotypical behavior in pets has not been studied extensively, even though several different types of compulsive behavior occur in different species including dogs. A dog may recurrently chase lights or shadows, bite or lick its own flank, pace compulsively or chase its own tail. Different environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to predispose to compulsive behavior. Many stereotypes are breed-specific, which emphasizes the role of genes. Compulsive tail chasing occurs in several dog breeds, but worldwide it is most common in breeds such as Bull Terriers and German Shepherds. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs, to identify possible environmental risk factors, and to find out whether a previously discovered gene region associated with compulsive behavior is also linked to tail chasing. Ads by Google AMD Genetic Testing - Macula Risk is reimbursed by insurers including Medicare - www.macularisk.com Could vitamins have an influence? Nearly 400 Finnish dogs participated in this study, including Bull Terriers, Miniature Bull Terriers, German Shepherds and Staffordshire Bull Terriers respectively. Blood samples were taken from the dogs participating in the study, and their owners filled out a questionnaire about their dogs' stereotypic behavior. The questionnaire included questions about different stereotypic behaviors, as well as aspects of each dog's puppyhood and the routines of the dog's current daily life. In addition to this the owners evaluated their dogs' personality based on the questions in the questionnaire. The study included dogs that chased their tails daily for several hours, dogs that chased their tails a few times a month, and dogs that had observably never chased their tails. With most of the dogs, the tail chasing had begun at the age of 3 to 6 months, before reaching sexual maturity. One of the most interesting findings of this study is the connection with stereotypic behavior and vitamins and minerals. Dogs that received nutritional supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, with their food, chased their tails less. "Our study does not prove an actual causal relationship between vitamins and lessened tail chasing, but interestingly similar preliminary results have been observed in human OCD" says researcher, Katriina Tiira, PhD. Follow-up studies will aim to prove whether vitamins could be beneficial in the treatment of tail chasing. Early separation from the mother and the mother's poor care of the puppy were also found in the study to predispose dogs to tail chasing. Early separation from the mother has been discovered to predispose also other animals to stereotypic behavior, but this is the first time this connection has been made with dogs. The amount of exercise the dogs received or the number of activities they engaged in did not, however, seem to have a connection with tail chasing. This could be comforting news to many owners of dogs with compulsive behaviors, since often the owners themselves or the dogs' living environment may be blamed for these behaviors. Although frustration and stress are likely to be significant causes of the occurrence of stereotypic behavior in for example zoo animals, they may be of lesser significance when it comes to Finnish dogs that are walked regularly. Tail chasing in dogs can be used as an animal model for studying the genetic background of OCD in humans Compared to the control dogs, tail chasers suffered more from also other stereotypic behaviors. In addition, tail chasers were more timid and afraid of loud noises. "Different types of compulsive behavior occur simultaneously in humans suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder or other diseases such as autism" explains the head of the study, Professor Hannes Lohi. Dogs may turn out to be of significant use in investigating the causes of human psychiatric diseases. "Stereotypic behavior occurs in dogs spontaneously; they share the same environment with humans, and as large animals are physiologically close to humans. Furthermore, their strict breed structure aids the identification of genes." The gene region previously associated with compulsive flank licking and biting in Dobermans was not found to be associated with tail chasing in any of the breeds in this study. The next aim of this research project is thus to discover new gene regions connected to tail chasing. The study is part of a larger DOGPSYCH project, funded by the European Research Council, in which the genetic background of different anxiety disorders, such as timidity, compulsive behavior and sound sensitivity are investigated, as well as their similarities with corresponding human diseases. Journal reference: PLoS ONE search and more info website Provided by University of Helsinki search and more info

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-08-canine-tail-resembles-human-obsessive.html#jCp

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